NV-Gov: Democratic nominee Sisolak—with inverted American flag behind him—blasts Trump’s SCOTUS pick

Nevada Democratic gubernatorial nominee Steve Sisolak blasted President Donald Trump’s pick to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy on the U.S. Supreme Court — Judge Brett Kavanaugh — outside Republican U.S. Sen. Dean Heller’s office in Las Vegas, the Review-Journal reported.

As Sisolak spoke at the Tuesday news conference, someone held aloft an upside-down American flag behind him. U.S. Flag Code prohibits such a display except for “dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property”:

#ShadySteve Sisolak, running for #nvgov against Iraq War veteran @AdamLaxalt, campaigns with an upside down American flag. Not a good look for him, but he seems to be okay with it. @ShadySteveS #TeamLaxalt pic.twitter.com/B7rzxMQT9i

— Robert Uithoven (@ruithoven) July 10, 2018

“With fewer and fewer safeguards for women’s reproductive rights at the national level, it’s critical that we stand strong here at the state level,” Sisolak said, according to the Review-Journal. “I believe women’s health care decisions are personal ones that should be made with her doctor, not dictated by a political agenda.”

Sisolak, the paper said, also noted the “far right, out-of-touch agenda” of Nevada Attorney General Adam Laxalt, who’s also the Republican gubernatorial nominee opposing Sisolak in November.

Laxalt campaign spokesman Parker Briden shot back Wednesday, calling out Sisolak’s “radical leftist policies” and the presence of the inverted flag behind him at the news conference.

“The only fringe candidate in this race is the one who has spent months campaigning on radical leftist policies and just held a press conference with the desecration of the American flag as his backdrop: Steve Sisolak,” Briden told TheBlaze.

Sisolak’s campaign on Wednesday didn’t immediately respond to TheBlaze’s request for comment on the flag and Briden’s other remarks.

Happening now: press conference with @SteveSisolak @AaronDFordNV @NelsonAraujoNV @MichelleGorelow @NaralNv voicing Nevadans’ opposition to Trump’s anti-choice SCOTUS nominee #StopKavanaugh #WhatsAtStake pic.twitter.com/m1oUSAPSOe

— NV Dems (@nvdems) July 10, 2018

What did Laxalt say about Kavanaugh?

Laxalt said Tuesday he believes “the left is going to try and politicize this nomination fight as much as they can” and that Kavanaugh will follow court precedent, the Review-Journal reported.

But if the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, Laxalt added to the paper that he doesn’t believe it will impact Nevada, citing a 1990 state referendum that “guarantees a woman’s right to have an abortion.”

What did Heller say about Kavanaugh?

Heller is looking forward to meeting with Kavanaugh and said the Senate will conduct “a thorough confirmation process,” Megan Taylor, a Heller spokeswoman, told the Review-Journal.

“Senator Heller believes that Judge Kavanaugh is a strong nominee and a mainstream jurist who has a record of defending the Constitution and respecting precedent,” Taylor added in a statement Tuesday, the paper said.

Who else spoke at the news conference?

Other Democratic political candidates — including Attorney General candidate Aaron Ford and Secretary of State candidate Nelson Araujo — joined members of NARAL Pro-Choice Nevada at the podium as well, the paper reported.

The inverted U.S. flag also flew while Ford and Araujo spoke:

“Nevadans agree that reproductive freedom is health care, and that women should be trusted to make their own decisions.” – @AaronDFordNV #StopKavanaugh #WhatsAtStake pic.twitter.com/yOmyr2Eix4

— NV Dems (@nvdems) July 10, 2018

“The time is now. The decision couldn’t be clearer. And we’re going to show come November that in Nevada, we stand up for women.” – @NelsonAraujoNV #StopKavanaugh #WhatsAtStake pic.twitter.com/1bSnDfmUmF

— NV Dems (@nvdems) July 10, 2018

Other news conference attendees wore “Battle Born Feminist Strong” shirts and held “Protect Roe” signs, the Review-Journal reported.


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