Top 5 weekend stories you may have missed: a hero doctor, a dinosaur mystery and the history of the KKK in Grand Forks | INFORUM

Local News 25-10-2021 IN FORUM 22

1. ‘My dad was a hero': Lifesaving Fargo doctor dies at 72 of COVID-19

FARGO — Dr. Gerald Kiedrowski was a member of the medical team that revived an 11-year-old boy who was submerged for 45 minutes in the icy water of the Red River in 1987.

Kiedrowski was an emergency room physician at the former St. Luke’s Hospital and restarted the heart of Alvaro Garza, a Moorhead boy who fell through the ice and was fished out of the frigid waters by emergency responders.

The boy's core body temperature had fallen to 77 degrees. His blood was warmed by a heart-and-lung machine.

“My dad was a hero,” said Megan Kiedrowski Bisers-Espelien on Sunday, Oct. 24. Gerald Kiedrowski died Saturday at age 72 at Sanford Broadway Medical Center of COVID-19, she said.

WDAY logo

listen live

watch live

Newsletter signup for email alerts

Read the full story here.

2. Landowners make emotional plea for higher F-M diversion buyout prices

The view looking north into the Wild Rice River control structure that's part of the Fargo-Moorhead area diversion project near Horace is seen on Thursday, Aug. 12, 2021.
David Samson / The Forum

The view looking north into the Wild Rice River control structure that's part of the Fargo-Moorhead area diversion project near Horace is seen on Thursday, Aug. 12, 2021. David Samson / The Forum

FARGO — Terry Sauvageau of Horace said people don't realize the sacrifice and stress he, his wife and other landowners are going through as they are forced to sell their land for the Fargo-Moorhead Area Diversion project.

Sauvageau, who lives southeast of Horace, believes they should get what they desire for the land needed for a 320-acre wetland construction project designed by the Army Corps of Engineers. The wetlands will replace other wetlands that will be lost to construction of the Diversion.

"It's ours, not yours. It's our property," Sauvageau told the Cass County Commission, which heard from eight landowners or their lawyers at a three-hour meeting on Monday, Oct. 18.

Read the full story here.

3. New housing development revitalizes Glyndon community

Kelly Richards stands in the 80-lot development Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021, he started in the southwest part of Glyndon after he said a new home hadn't been built in his hometown for 12 years.  The Southview project features a U-shaped pond in the middle of the development with a walking path around it and lighted fountains in the summer.
Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

Kelly Richards stands in the 80-lot development Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021, he started in the southwest part of Glyndon after he said a new home hadn't been built in his hometown for 12 years. The Southview project features a U-shaped pond in the middle of the development with a walking path around it and lighted fountains in the summer. Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

GLYNDON — Lifelong Glyndon resident Kelly Richards knew "something had to change" when he realized a new home hadn't been built in the community for 12 years.

So, the real estate agent and bus company owner bought 40 acres on the southwest side of town and three years ago started a housing development called Southview.

"You can be to West Acres (shopping mall) in 15 minutes," he said during a tour of the area.

Read the full story here.

4. Newly uncovered North Dakota fossils could stir T. rex vs. Nanotyrannus debate

Mike Kjelland, of Fossil Excavators, holds part of a large femur bone next to a much smaller femur bone fossil belonging to a prehistoric birdlike creature called an Anzu wyliei, nicknamed the chicken from hell by paleontologists. The larger femur, found during a dig in western North Dakota in the summer of 2021, could be from a heretofore unknown species related to the Anzu, according to Kjelland. The photo was taken at the Black Hills Institute of Geological Research in South Dakota. 
Contributed / Fossil Excavators

Mike Kjelland, of Fossil Excavators, holds part of a large femur bone next to a much smaller femur bone fossil belonging to a prehistoric birdlike creature called an Anzu wyliei, nicknamed the chicken from hell by paleontologists. The larger femur, found during a dig in western North Dakota in the summer of 2021, could be from a heretofore unknown species related to the Anzu, according to Kjelland. The photo was taken at the Black Hills Institute of Geological Research in South Dakota. Contributed / Fossil Excavators

BOWMAN, N.D. — Michael Kjelland, a hunter of dinosaur fossils, was hiking in western North Dakota about two years ago with his father, Mike Sr., prospecting for new finds when he noticed a promising patch of ground consistent with the Hell Creek Formation, a layer of geological material renowned for fossils.

Kjelland thought it would be a good spot to return to the next digging season, so he contacted the landowners and was given permission to do so.

That led to the discovery of a Triceratops skull that in turn became the subject of a Wall Street Journal documentary exploring the roles that various entities, including for-profit companies, universities, governments and nonprofit companies, play in the commercial fossil trade.

Read the full story here.

5. North Dakota pastor's 'big lie' turned many Protestants against their Catholic neighbors

F. Halsey Ambrose, a Grand Forks minister and top local Klan leader. Photo courtesy of State Historical Society of North Dakota / Special to The Forum

F. Halsey Ambrose, a Grand Forks minister and top local Klan leader. Photo courtesy of State Historical Society of North Dakota / Special to The Forum

The Big Lie” (große Lüge) is defined as “a gross distortion or misrepresentation of the truth, used especially as a propaganda technique.” It is often employed by a person or group of people against another group of people to make that group look like they are plotting or have plotted to do something that causes harm or injustice to the masses of common, hard-working citizens.

In Grand Forks during the 1920s, F. Halsey Ambrose and the Ku Klux Klan succeeded in getting Catholics purged from the city government because, they claimed in their theory, “Roman Catholics cannot be good Americans because the Catholic’s first allegiance is to the pope in Rome,” implying that ultimately, the pope would have the final say on how Catholic city officials would run the city.

Read the full story here.


Read The Rest at IN FORUM- (opens a new tab)





Pages